"I very much enjoyed reading Tamper, an original mix of Fortean insight into the paranormal and a
coming-of-age novel."  - - Adrian Dover, Creator of
The Ladder: A Henry James Website
writer, videographer, coffee drinker, lucid dreamer, seeker of links
between mysticism and science, a few other things
Welcome to the web site of Bill Ectric
Sein und Werden
presents
Time Adjusters
A Novella by Bill Ectric  

Free Download
 
     
 New from Sein und Werden / Books

British author Steve Aylett writes in multiple genres, usually
simultaneously, combining elements of science fiction and
fantasy with comedy and a high literary aesthetic. As a result
of his unique style, Aylett has garnered throngs of devotees in
underground circles. Some say he is too clever and
grandiloquent for genre readers, and too genre for literary
readers, infusing his meta-pulp fictions with intricate networks
of hi-tech and/or bizarre novums. Like J. G. Ballard, Aylett
belies, if not capsizes, formulaic methods and ultimately
constitutes a genre in and of himself. This book offers a
comprehensive commentary and analysis of his singular body of
work, including original essays by D. Harlan Wilson, Spencer
Pate, Bill Ectric, Andrew Wenaus, Iain Matheson, Robert Kiely,
Jim Matthews, John Oakes, Michael Norris, Tony Lee, Sam
Reader; commentary by Alan Moore and Michael Moorcock, and
an exclusive interview with Aylett by Rachel Haywire.
"Tamper is somewhere between The X Files and Catcher in the Rye...
You WON'T be disappointed!"
- Dr. Tim Gilmore, author of
This Kind of City: Ghost Stories and
Psychological Landscapes
Tamper is about a boy named Whit who grows up in the 1960s
obsessed with unexplained mysteries, B movies, and strange
noises in the basement. If you like secret passages, pulp
magazines like
Amazing Stories and Weird Tales, Aldous
Huxley's
The Doors of Perception, small-town childhood
escapades reminiscent of Jean Shepherd's
A Christmas Story,
and arcane historical fiction,
Tamper is your kind of book.  
Tamper takes its name from 1940s pulp science fiction writer
Richard Shaver, who claimed that underground mutants were
using invisible rays to tamper with his mind. Whit can relate!
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"The 1980s were a strange time for me. As much as I wanted to
accept the amenities and corporate trappings, I couldn’t
shake the feeling that something was wrong."
Time becomes fragmented when insurance companies discover
technology to capture images of future disaster areas so
adjusters can deny coverage to those who need it most.
Time Adjusters will hook you in at the start and hold your
interest up to and beyond the thrilling end sequence. Despite
the experimental cut up sections, the narrative structure is
strong enough to hold its own. The references to Philip K. Dick
and Max Headroom give some idea of Bill Ectric's mindset.